April 2012

dem2012_04

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Features: Route 1 Issue

Miles 0 to 69

Route 1, Miles 0 to 69: Acadian Country By: Virginia M. Wright

Miles 70 to 213

Route 1, Miles 70 to 213: Potato Fields and Deep Woods

Miles 214 to 333

Route 1, Miles 214 to 333: Down East

Miles 334 to 451

Route 1, Miles 334 to 451: The Midcoast

Miles 452 to 527

Route 1, Miles 452 to 527: Southern Maine

The Road Less Taken

The many faces of Route 1A. By: Edgar Allen Beem

Route 1: Many Names, One History

U.S. Route 1 in Maine is 527 miles of pavement that snakes its way from Kittery to Fort Kent, the northern terminus of the historic road that begins (or ends) 2,390 miles south in Key West, Florida. Though Route 1 is old, established, and familiar, it is also a dynamic highway that refuses to lie quietly in its bed. It’s always on the move, often at the center of controversy. By: Edgar Allen Beem

Departments

Belfast’s Colonial Century

A historic theater celebrates a big birthday. By: Will Bleakley

North by East

The real 007 had a thing for birds — and Maine, the unsolved case of Portland’s missing mascot, and more.

Sounds of Nature

Birches Lo (maxgarciaconover.bandcamp.com, $6 CD; $5 MP3) is a new live album and the second EP overall from Portland-based guitarist Max García Conover. The sound is raw, stripped bare of any computer or studio magic. It’s jarring at first, but the organic sound of one man and his masterful guitar playing makes the songs all the more powerful.

Crunchy Granola

Photography by Molly Blake

Where in Maine?

Have you ever tossed a pair into this shoe tree?

Old Growth

A wildlife biologist mourns the passing of a majestic cedar grove.

Letters to the Editor

Read what our readers have to say about Maine.

Net Loss

Are the Gulf of Maine’s cod — and cod fishermen — really doomed? By: Colin Woodard

Passion Project

David Turin’s eponymous eatery overlooking Monument Square has become a Portland institution. By: Michaela Cavallaro Photography by: Mark Fleming

Two Maine Statesmen

Two recent biographies illuminate the character and courage of Maine Senators Fessenden and Reed.

Editor’s Note

I have to say I envied Jason and Ginny their adventures along Route 1.

 

 

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